Thursday, 20 March 2014

through wondering eyes

 
the world rises
  
big, bright, 
blossoming

smiles:
  
spellbinds 

enchants . . .
 
through eyes wide
  wondering

of a wondering little child.


note:  Pictured is the Britannia Mine Museum (a 45 minute drive from Vancouver, off the Sea-to-Sky Highway) - a National Historic Site.  In its 70 year operation, it was the biggest copper mine in the British Empire.

photo:  Little Boy - Big Truck – H. Bourke

© 2014 Wendy Bourke

12 comments:

  1. we should hold onto that awe...with the eyes of the child...
    seeing how big and beautiful and full of magic the world can be...

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  2. yes - and remind ourselves: little children do see the world with wonder - but they do see the world. We, as adults, must guard against doing or saying anything that might diminish their awe. Thanks, Brian.

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  3. Ahh! To see with their eyes again...
    My nephew was so fascinated by wheels and vehicles of all sorts when he was small. That photo is so appropriate!

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    1. The picture, I know. I couldn't believe it, the first time I saw that shot of the little guy with that enormous truck.

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  4. The wonder of a child...sigh...a wonderful thing! I love the look on their faces in those moments...and their questions...it helps me to remind myself to be in awe too, even with things I've become accustomed to.

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    1. The wonderment and awe of a little child - really, beyond words, Jennifer.

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  5. As I was reading the poem aloud the vowels and the 'i's forced me to gape wide...wow
    wonder everywhere.. in the eyes of the child, in the photo and in the lines...

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  6. I’m really blown away that you picked up on that, Sumana. Yes, indeed, I did try to put “eyes” (a long vowel “ī”) throughout the poem – “rises, bright, smiles, spellbinds, wide, child” (and, of course, “eyes” in the title and the poem, itself). It’s a very tiny little verse (just 18 words and 1/3 of them have “ī”s). Occasionally, I have a bit of fun when I pen a poem that short (particularly, if it’s about a child) by doing something a bit different. But I’m amazed you caught it! Very good!

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  7. I really want to have more of that child in me.. and such nice way to use alliterations..

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    1. Children, the children of friends, nieces and nephews and grandchildren are such a gift that way. Just about the time, that you've almost forgotten the joy in a child's wonder - a little one wanders into your life and reminds you. Smiles.

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  8. Looking at the world through the eyes of a child is definitely a gift. I love to experience life through the life of my grandchildren, most especially my six-year-old granddaughter. There is real joy to be experienced through the eyes and heart of one so young.

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  9. It's so true. One forgets - but then, if you're lucky - a little child enters your life and leads you back to the joy! Sigh . . .

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