Wednesday, 15 October 2014

wet daggers



once the promises fizzled 
there wasn’t much left to share
just a vague, unpleasant, sense . . . 
that there was something, they had forgotten
in the stuff and hurt wrapped in hollow swaggers

~ as they emptied out the place and passed halfway up the stairs ~

this was their story ending:
awkward, in deliberately averted eyes, 
so close they could have touched once more,
if not for the lies between them – and so they walked away 
flashing a backwards glare in twisted grimaces and wet daggers

note:  a puente

photo:  Yaletown Windows in a Brick Wall – W. Bourke

© 2014 Wendy Bourke

11 comments:

  1. ugh....sad....
    lies erode...and most likely somewhere
    along the way they did forget something
    that was once important...

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  2. Oh Wendy--such a painful piece--but I love this--just so well written!

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  3. When it comes to this it is far easier to part. There is not much emotions to hold things back. Sad but it does happen! Great lines Wendy!

    Hank

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  4. like this bridge poem may their gap be bridged though it's very hard...a nice write...

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  5. Once those lies been uttered it's so hard to repair.. you will end up utterly alone.

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  6. Truth should always be the pivot of any relationship

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  7. Ouch. Such a sad situation when a relationship is at a point like this. This brought to my mind a song by Martina McBride called "Strangers." Excellent work with the form.

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  8. It looks like you've captured well the essence of that relationship! I find these words especially powerful: "so close they could have touched once more."

    You've inspired me to learn more about the puente.

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    1. I'm loving the puente form more and more. I think because, it appeals to my affection for form poetry and yet allows for a lot of variation and freedom:

      the first and third stanzas can be any number of lines (though) the number of lines must be equal;
      they can employ some sort of rhyming scheme or be first verse;
      and the iambic feet are not rigid.

      The second stanza (bridging line) is where the fun starts and can really get one's creativity going as it must act as the last line of the first stanza and the first line of the third stanza. I've written several puentes since I was first introduced to the form at Poetry Jam and enjoy them very much.

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  9. Powerful poem, Wendy! Break-ups are not easy and can indeed be very awkward. You have pinned it well.

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